Olivia's Revels

Random Musings

Thunder in Melbourne

christinetheastrophysicist:

Exploring the Quantum World
Researchers at JPL and Caltech have developed an instrument for exploring the cosmos and the quantum world.
This new type of amplifier boosts electrical signals and can be used for everything from studying stars, galaxies and black holes to exploring the quantum world and developing quantum computers. An amplifier is a device that increases the strength of a weak signal.
One of the key features of the new amplifier is that it incorporates superconductors—materials that allow an electric current to flow with zero resistance when lowered to certain temperatures. For their amplifier, the researchers are using titanium nitride and niobium titanium nitride, which have just the right properties to allow the pump signal to amplify the weak signal.
Although the amplifier has a host of potential applications, the reason the researchers built the device was to help them study the universe. The team built the instrument to boost microwave signals, but the new design can be used to build amplifiers that help astronomers observe in a wide range of wavelengths, from radio waves to X-rays.

christinetheastrophysicist:

Exploring the Quantum World

Researchers at JPL and Caltech have developed an instrument for exploring the cosmos and the quantum world.

This new type of amplifier boosts electrical signals and can be used for everything from studying stars, galaxies and black holes to exploring the quantum world and developing quantum computers. An amplifier is a device that increases the strength of a weak signal.

One of the key features of the new amplifier is that it incorporates superconductors—materials that allow an electric current to flow with zero resistance when lowered to certain temperatures. For their amplifier, the researchers are using titanium nitride and niobium titanium nitride, which have just the right properties to allow the pump signal to amplify the weak signal.

Although the amplifier has a host of potential applications, the reason the researchers built the device was to help them study the universe. The team built the instrument to boost microwave signals, but the new design can be used to build amplifiers that help astronomers observe in a wide range of wavelengths, from radio waves to X-rays.

Democratic societies can’t really work like that, because the state can’t control behavior by force. It can to some extent, but it’s much more limited in its capacity to control by force. Therefore, it has to control what you think. And again, democratic theorists have understood this for 50 or 60 years and have been very articulate about it.

If the voice of the people is heard, you’d better control what that voice says, meaning you have to control what they think.
One of the ways you control what people think is by creating the illusion that there’s a debate going on, but making sure that that debate stays within very narrow margins. Namely, you have to make sure that both sides in the debate accept certain assumptions, and those assumptions turn out to be the propaganda system.

As long as everyone accepts the propaganda system, then you can have a debate.

—Noam Chomsky (via cultureofresistance)

(Source: noam-chomsky, via infinity-imagined)

I’m not in search of sanctity, sacredness, purity; these things are found after this life, not in this life; but in this life I search to be completely human: to feel, to give, to take, to laugh, to get lost, to be found, to dance, to love and to lust, to be so human.

C. JoyBell C. (via hip-)

Wow, in a nut shell.

(via too-rare—to-die)

(Source: larmoyante, via too-rare--to-die)

whenthesongends:

Caddis fly larvae are known to incorporate bits of whatever they can find into their cocoons, be it fish bone or bits of leaves. Hubert Duprat gave them gold, turquoise, gems and pearls.

whenthesongends:

Caddis fly larvae are known to incorporate bits of whatever they can find into their cocoons, be it fish bone or bits of leaves. Hubert Duprat gave them gold, turquoise, gems and pearls.

(Source: helendurth, via mineralia)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Two jets of sugar syrup collide and interact to form very different patterns.  On the left, the two jets have a low flow rate and create a chain-like wake.  The jets on the right have a higher flow rate and produce a liquid sheet that breaks down into filaments and droplets. The result is often likened to fish bones. (Photo credit: Rebecca Ing)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Two jets of sugar syrup collide and interact to form very different patterns.  On the left, the two jets have a low flow rate and create a chain-like wake.  The jets on the right have a higher flow rate and produce a liquid sheet that breaks down into filaments and droplets. The result is often likened to fish bones. (Photo credit: Rebecca Ing)

discoverynews:

NASA’s Kepler telescope finds 26 new planets
Kepler, NASA’s planet-hunting space telescope, has found 11 new planetary systems, including one with five planets all orbiting closer to their parent star than Mercury circles the Sun, scientists said on Thursday.

The discoveries boost the list of confirmed planets outside the Earth’s solar system to 729, including 60 found by the Kepler team. The telescope, launched in space in March 2009, can detect slight but regular dips in the amount of light coming from stars. Scientists can then determine if the changes are caused by orbiting planets passing by, relative to Kepler’s view.

Kepler scientists have another 2,300 candidate planets awaiting additional confirmation. (Photos/illustrations by NASA/Ames/JPL-Caltech; University of Toulouse; Reuters/AFP/Getty Images)

(Source: nationalpost, via christinetheastrophysicist)